The Ideal Brain Tonic

Picture by Swami
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Do what you like. Express-Explore-Consume-Innovate.
A few decades from now, our time will be termed as the Golden Era of a digital world – Swami

Good Night- A Poem by Swami

She scratches her nose
Rubs her face
And turns away
When I caress my princess in her sleep

White horses with wings
Chase a lone cloud on a cliff is
Her frequent dream

I wait with longing eyes
But soon it becomes unbearable…
I gently tap her hand a few times
She babbles, I don’t know what?!
I frown for as long!
Finally, she turns back
Throws her arm across me
Grin runs across her face
When I snuggle her tight
Good night 🙂

* In case you don’t who Swami is, he’s my friend, a very dear friend and a ace blogger. After much persuasion he agreed to do a guest post on my blog. Your likes and comments are much appreciated.
What’s below? Ahem! 😀

dedicated 1
For centuries, scientists strictly indulged in gravity, space, locomotive, energy…
Only with advent of capitalism, focus was evened out with emphasis also on tooth brush design, stain removers, instant noodles…
However, the most noteworthy evolution has been with brassiere. Just a few decades ago they were miserably dull, over protective and discouraging.

Good Morning

It’s time
Sun is on standby
Good morning
Another morning
Empty roads trigger into a freshly drawn battlefield
Honking, marching, pacing, racing
Locomotives chase
The invisible Ferrari of happiness
Red-marked lipid profiles
Crop up on the streets
Brisk walking to survive another day
Reporting rapists, murderers, filthy politicians
News bundle lands on my courtyard
It’s time…
Electrifying red transcends upon the sky
Devours the stars
I pull in the curtains dark
My eyes droopy, exhausted
Good night

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Fate Sealed

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Pulp of the heartwood
Embeds my poems
Laddered with the stench of pigments and dyes
Ink rollers and the water rollers
On the plate round
Inciting the offset
To impose
His ignoble authority
My imperious puke in blind uniformity

I won’t be I
No more
Shuddering amongst the bestsellers
Discounted, pleading for attention
Your fluttering slave forever
The heartwood grumbles its forsaken fate
Brahms performs scrupulously
Stop rewind play
Quintet

What Will You be When You Grow Up?

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70’s in India was a period of limited exposure. Kids then had no clue of Chinese toys, cartoon channels, pizzas or Mac Donald’s unlike today. No television instead a large-sized radio was the only home entertainment and we had our ears glued to a fifteen minute play every night on All India Radio before wrapping to bed. In fact I vividly remember, my first ever introduction to the world outside was Chinese food but cooked in Indian style although my father never took us to a Chinese joint. He detested Chinese for screwing Indians real bad in the 62′ war.

My parents did like movies. Twice a month, we watched random movies but each time Amol Palekar’s movie released, we had to watch it first day last show. Any theater would do. My mother had a huge crush on Amol Palekar, a mystery my father and I never did figure out but he made sure to book tickets in advance. Messing with his wife meant a huge financial blow as nothing less than a visit to a jewelry store could possibly calm her down.

Amol Palekar
amol palekar

On Sundays and school holidays, I’d go with my father on his scooter to our highway gas station. That’s my family tradition. When the son turns five, he’s got to learn stuff about his family business and I was my parent’s only son.

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This is how it works. When I passed out from school, my father asked “What’s next son?” I told him I wanted to study further. When I finished my high school, he checked again “So, what’s next son?” I asked “Can I go to college?”. He smiled with worried eyes. But when I abruptly quit college he was the happiest man on earth. “Son, it’s high time you join our family business. I’ll get you married to the prettiest girl from our community in a year’s time and send you off for your honeymoon. How about – Mount Abu? Manali is too far and cold,Mount Abu is just a four hour drive. You can take a bus and son; you got to realize value of money”

Anyway, life did not transpire as they had planned. A story for another time.

My father’s gas station is on a large chunk of land, he owns on the state highway. When he started way back in the 70’s, he rented out excess land to two enterprises that complemented his business.

Shankar, better known as Madrasi was a dark stout guy with large shoulders and an over-sized but stiff belly, ran a tyre repair shop. He slogged from six in the morning till he hit his whisky bottle sharp at eight in the night. He had the cutest smile and a perfect set of white teeth and none dared approach him for any job after eight p.m. His drab room had a large poster of Jayalalitha (A south Indian actress) in dancing pose and the rumor was he spoke to the poster in the night, though in the eighties as he grew older, he found his true love in Silk Smitha.

Jayalalitha
jayalalitha-tamil-actress

Silk Smitha
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Sharma, a skinny, shrewd man got the bigger pie of land to run his vegetarian restaurant. To begin with, he knew a few drivers from his hometown who plied on that highway frequently. At his own risk he offered them fuel on credit but charged a monthly interest of 3%. My father took his share of money from interest accrued.
So here’s the deal. If you dine at Sharma’s restaurant, you can park your truck overnight, rent a makeshift bed for a nominal charge and buy fuel on credit.

Despite the horrors of my family tradition, I looked forward to my Sundays. The countryside breeze, smell of gas, cheap toffees for free was nothing less than a day’s picnic, but the most eventful moment was getting inside a truck. I’d wait for the most colorful, swanky truck to stop by and the drivers never refused to let me in for a peek. The size of truck overwhelmed me as a child. My tiny hands holding the massive steering wheel, watching myself in the large rear-view mirror, looking at people from above, listening to Bollywood music on a treble pushed up stereo made for my few good childhood memories. Each time I entered a truck cabin, it gave a sense of its owner, his mobile world stacked with choicest collections from places I hadn’t had a clue of then. Pictures of his wife, kids placed in an angle his eyes won’t miss while driving. Then those drivers seemed as perfect husbands and fathers to me. “I am a king on a giant chariot, always on the move” remarked one driver, I had met.

We visited a family friend on a Sunday evening right after my day out at the gas station. On the dinner table, our host triggered one of my worst blunders, “Son, so what will you be when you grow up?” I shot right back “I’m going to be a truck driver.”

That was the quietest dinner, we ever had.

* Thumbnail pictures are sourced from the net.

Blues

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a guy on the phone
outside a bar i was in
he was relentlessly pleading
obviously to a girl
the barkeep and me were convinced

he walked in athirst
with tears in his eyes
“a double please”
and on the far end
a voice drumming the dead-end
our guy had reached

he bolted down the glass empty
fade out, fade in…
phone landed near the toilet door
and a lover at my feet

i rushed for the phone, gave my ear a check
“hello hello, what was that?” She bellowed
a familiar voice, i kinda felt

“gimme the phone”
the die-hard lover was back on his feet
“it’s still on” i asserted with a smile
the barkeep too smiled
he’s my friend
and i’m a gentleman
you know that

he grabbed the phone
“i blacked out”
she disconnected